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Pyschology 1 4245/4246

  • Full Year - .50 credit per semester (Humanities/Elective credit)

This course begins with a review of the ways people have sought to explain human behavior from ancient times through today and provides an overview of the major principles and concepts of psychology, including the brain, human development, personality, learning, cognition, and the scientific method. Students will participate in dozens of activities and real life situations designed to bring the content alive and help them apply the material to their own lives. Magazines, book excerpts, and movies will also play a role in our search for knowledge. Particular emphasis will be placed upon fostering feelings of empathy for others—particularly those who are mentally ill. A sociocultural approach will be explored as a means for understanding a variety of cultures and how social aspects impact us as individuals. Students will leave the class with insights into the causes of human behavior as well as a better understanding of themselves.

AP Pyschology 4249/4250

  • Full Year - .50 credit per semester (Humanities/Elective credit)
  • Prerequisite: This course is for juniors and seniors only
  • Materials needed: A $10.00 fee is required to cover consumable items

The AP Psychology class is a one year course designed to give students a working knowledge of the theories and key concepts of each of the major subfields as well as expose students to many of the contributing psychologists and significant research studies, both historical and current, that have shaped our understanding of behavior and mental processes.  The class will train students to apply psychological principles and understand connections between ideas and theories and leave students with an appreciation of the scientific methods and ethical procedures that produce such knowledge. This course covers a wide array of fascinating subjects: from the history of the discipline to how we develop over our lifetimes; from dreams and hypnosis to how we function within groups; from thinking and language to who we are as individuals. Our journey into the world of psychology will take us all the way from the basic chemistry of our nervous system to the workings of our mind, and to our relationships with others in complex social settings. We read a college level textbook and participate in a myriad of hands-on activities and demonstrations to experience first-hand a variety of psychological principles. There is a summer assignment. Students must also take the Advanced Placement Psychology Test given in May in order to receive AP credit. This exam costs approximately $94.00

Senior Seminar 7133/7134

  • Spring or Fall - .50 credit (Elective credit)
  • Prerequisite: This course is for seniors only
  • Materials needed: Pen, pencil, and notebook, $5.00 for consumable supplies and subscription fee

The content of this course will include materials and curriculum designed to assist students in becoming active participants in the modern world. Students will develop an understanding of investments tools that can be utilized to build a sound financial future. Emphasis will be placed on building good credit and the responsible use of credit. The stock market and long term investments strategies will also be examined. Moreover, it will analyze the construction of rental leases, explain tenant and landlord responsibilities, discuss the merits of insurance, and examine other issues related to renting property. Other topics will include the home buying process, the mortgage industry and the pros and cons of home ownership. Public speaking, the college scholarship process and the development of good citizenship will also be emphasized.

Frosh Mentor 7197/7198

  • Full Year only - .50 credit per semester (elective credit)
  • Prerequisites: This course is open to 10-12 students on an approval basis only and requires completion of an application as well as teacher recommendations.
  • Materials needed: Pencil, paper, and notebook; students will occasionally have to provide their own transportation to district-wide student leadership meetings.

As a Frosh Mentor you will meet with “your” freshmen daily during their Freshmen Seminar class and your responsibilities will include:

  • Checking their grades/assignment completion daily
  • Assisting with homework when necessary
  • Assisting students in getting work made up or extra assistance with a particular teacher.
  • Teaching study skills/organization
  • Helping them get to know the school culture

Peer Tutor 8162/8163

  • Full Year only - .50 credit per semester (elective credit)
  • Prerequisites: Peer tutors must complete an application, be interviewed by the VP Curriculum and be approved for peer tutoring. Peer tutors must attend a one-hour training prior to tutoring.
  • Materials needed: Pencil, paper, and notebook; students will occasionally have to provide their own transportation to district-wide student leadership meetings.

Reno High School Peer tutors work one on one with students or in a whole class situation in core academic subjects. Reno High School Peer tutors work one on one with students or in a whole class situation in core academic subjects.

Student Evaluation:

  • Peer tutor grade is based on participation and willingness to tutor.
  • Supervising teacher issues grade.
  • An essay test will be given as the final semester exam.

Office Experience 8121/8122

  • Full Year only - Limited to (1) credit total. .50 credit per semester (elective credit)
  • Prerequisites: Approval of Asst. Principal; 3.0 GPA

This course is designed to cover all areas of a large office by on-the-job training in the school’s central office. The student will learn effective office skills, office procedures, appropriate work attitudes, and use of various office machines as well as the school switchboard.

Students will be expected to perform duties related to:

  • switchboard, alphabetizing, delivering, messages/packages, filing, shredding, proper message taking, mail, comp time, parent/student interaction, fax machines, copy machines, general office procedures

Evaluation and Grading:

  • Attendance, cooperation, individual improvement, participation and effort and adherence to school policies.

Library Assistant 8095/8096

  • Full Year only - .50 credit per semester (elective credit)
  • Prerequisites: Librarian's approval

The goal of this course is to make students aware of the services a library offers and to give them hands-on experience in the processing and circulation of library materials. Students will work at the circulation desk, learn how to process and shelve books, perform book repair and other clerical services, laminate material, create and maintain bulletin boards, and use the Internet for research purposes, including subscription databases.

College & Career Center Assistant 8135/8136

  • Full Year only - .50 credit per semester (elective credit)
  • Prerequisites: College and Career Center Coordinator approval, some computer knowledge, and the ability to keep information confidential.

The goal of this course is to make students aware of the services available in the College and Career Center and to give hands-on experience with college and career materials. Assistant is responsible for scholarship filing and copying, aiding students with word processing and career software programs, maintaining scholarship, career and college files, the job board, and bulletin boards, answering phones, and cleaning the center.

Student Aide 8171/8172

  • Full year or fall/spring = .25 credit may be earned each semester. A student cannot earn more than one (1) credit in his/her high school years as a student aide.
  • Prerequisites: This class will not be allowed for students who are not in good standing and on track for graduation.

A student cannot be an aide for more than one teacher during a given semester. This course is not offered for 9th grade students. Teacher permission is required to enroll as an aide, and a teacher may drop a student as an aide if he/she is not performing his/her assigned tasks at the expected level. Petitions may be picked up from a counselor.

Grading is Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only.

PLTW – Intro to Engineering Design 10737/10738

  • Level 1
  • Full year or fall/spring = .25 credit may be earned each semester. A student cannot earn more than one (1) credit in his/her high school years as a student aide.

This course is the entry-level course of the Project Lead the Way Pathway to Engineering curriculum. The major focus of IED is the design process and its application. Through hands-on projects, students apply engineering standards and document their work. Students use industry standard 3D modeling software to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems, document their work using an engineer’s notebook, and communicate solutions to peers and members of the professional community.

Journalism 1-2 1409/1410

  • Full Year - .50 Credit per Semester (Art/Humanities or Elective Credit)
  • Materials Needed: A $20 lab fee is required to cover consumable materials.

This course is designed to teach students the skills necessary for communicating in print media today with emphasis on interviewing and writing. Emphasis will also be placed on research, journalistic law and ethics, newspaper layout/design, entry level photography, and ad sales/business. *When enrollment numbers necessitate, this class is taught at the same time and in the same room as Advanced Newspaper. In that situation, students in Journalism 1-2 learn through a hands-on publication process.

Advanced Journalism: Newspaper 1411/1412

  • Full Year - .50 Credit per Semester (Art/Humanities or Elective Credit)
  • Prerequisites: Journalism 1-2 with a grade of B or better; recommendation from previous English or journalism teacher.
  • Materials Needed: A $20 lab fee is required to cover consumable materials.

This course is designed to teach students the skills necessary for communicating in print media today. The emphasis is on print publication. The course will build on interviewing and writing skills, research, journalistic law and ethics, newspaper layout/design, photography, and ad sales/business. All class members will have staff positions on the Red and Blue newspaper, such as: reporter, page designer, copy editor, business manager, etc. Selected students will serve on a student editorial board responsible for all editorial content and decisions, under the guidance and assistance of the adviser. In addition to daily class attendance, editors must be able to work after school and on occasional weekends during deadline periods. All students will be required to solicit advertisements to help pay for production costs. Failure to meet production deadlines may result in being removed from an editorial position or in being dropped from the class.

Advanced Publications: Yearbook 1403/1404

  • Full Year - .50 Credit per Semester (Art/Humanities or Elective Credit)
  • Prerequisites: Cumulative grade point average of 3.00 or higher (un-weighted), A or B in English and a recommendation from current English teacher, properly completed online application that includes 4 current teachers who can give recommendations regarding student performance (must include current English teacher), appropriately formatted audition work in design, photography, interviewing and writing, and final approval from yearbook teacher/adviser.
  • Materials Needed: A $30 fee covers the cost of consumable items (paper, toner, and other items) as well as staff gear (t-shirts, sweatshirts, etc.). If the staff chooses more expensive items, students will be asked to cover those costs.
  • 10th grade standing (Incoming freshmen and others interested in joining the yearbook staff are STRONGLY encouraged to take Introduction to Journalism to prepare themselves for the rigorous performance level of this class and increase the opportunity for editorial leadership positions.)

Students enrolled in this course will sell and create advertising; take, select, and edit photographs; interview students, faculty, staff, and coaches; and design, redesign, and critique the design of the pages of the Re-Wa- Ne yearbook under the direction and supervision of student editors and faculty adviser. Students on staff must be highly organized, have a good eye for design, have excellent time and self-management skills, and be prepared to complete multiple tasks within each monthly deadline period to a high standard of quality. All staffers must complete an application with four current teacher endorsements. Photographers must complete an audition assignment in addition to application. Adviser approval is required to enroll.

Speech/Debate 6411/6412

  • Full Year - .50 Credit per Semester (Art/Humanities or Elective Credit)
  • Materials needed: A $75 lab fee which covers local and national league memberships, evidence costs, transportation, tournament registration fees, and classroom supplies. Students will also need to have personal food/snack money at each tournament.

This course will provide students with basic knowledge of debate and technique/instruction in public and competitive speaking. The course will include instruction in ten types of formal speeches, three categories of debate, and Student Congress. Students will review and analyze famous speeches of the past, as well as write and analyze speeches of today. Participation in speech and debate tournaments outside of school hours, approximately one per month is required. Students will develop knowledge of debate theory and speaking ability which will allow them to compete in interscholastic competition. Students will learn logical structure, reasoning, and analysis of argumentation.

Advanced Speech/Debate 6413/6414

  • Full Year - .50 Credit per Semester (Art/Humanities or Elective Credit)
  • Prerequisites: Beginning Speech/Debate and teacher approval
  • Materials Needed: A $75 lab fee which covers local & national league memberships, evidence costs, transportation, tournament registration fees, and classroom supplies. Students will also need to have personal food/snack money at each tournament.

Advanced Speech/Debate is designed to provide students with the advanced theory and research techniques needed for higher level competition. The course will refine the student's speaking techniques. Students will continue to build on previous knowledge, while expanding their competitive knowledge and ability. Advanced Speech & Debate will also prepare students for collegiate competition by introducing speech and debate forms used at the college level. Advanced students are required to compete in all league tournaments. Students will increase their knowledge of debate and speaking theory. Students will further refine their ability to structure logically, to reason, and to analyze.

AP Macroeconomics 4222

  • Spring Only - .50 credit (AP Elective credit)
  • Prerequisites: This course is open to ALL juniors and seniors and to qualified sophomores. See instructor to determine if you meet the qualifications.
  • Materials needed: Pen, pencil, and notebook, $10.00 consumable supplies. All students must take the AP Economic History exam in May; therefore, they will need to pay the cost of this exam, which is approximately $94.00

Advance Placement Macroeconomics is a course designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of the principles of economics in examining aggregate economic behavior. Students taking the course can expect to learn how the measures of economic performance, such as GDP, inflation and unemployment, are constructed and how to apply them to evaluate the macroeconomic conditions of an economy. Students will also learn the basic analytical tools of macroeconomics, primarily the aggregate demand and aggregate supply model and its application in the analysis and determination of national income, as well as evaluating the effectiveness of fiscal policy and monetary policy in promoting economic growth and stability. Recognizing the global nature of economics, students will also have ample opportunities to examine the impact of international trade and international finance on national economies. Various economic schools of thought are introduced as solutions to economic problems are considered.

AP Human Geography 4181/4182

  • Full Year - .50 credit (AP Elective credit)
  • Prerequisite: In order to be considered for AP Human Geography, students need to have earned a “C” or higher in both semesters of World History or AP European History, be a Junior or Senior and have the recommendation of their previous Social Studies instructor.  This class will satisfy elective credits for graduation.
  • Materials Needed: Pencil, Pen, Notebook $5 for consumable supplies. Students will be required to take the Advanced Placement exam in May.  The cost of the exam is approximately $91.  Financial assistance is available for students who demonstrate need.

Advanced Placement Human Geography is a college-level course designed to meet the equivalent objectives of an introductory level Human Geography course at most universities. The curriculum focuses on the seven content areas of the Advanced Placement exam: 1) Geography: Its Nature and Perspective, 2) Population, 3) Cultural Patterns and Processes, 4) Political Organization of Space, 5) Agriculture and Rural Land Use, 6) Industrialization and Economic Development, and 7) Cities and Urban Land Use. The course is designed for students with strong skills and motivation to learn. A strong interest and knowledge of world geography and current events will be helpful in this class. Plan to have homework 3-4 times a week, mostly consisting of reading. Activities will be the main focus of classroom instruction as geography is a "hands on" subject. There will also be some instruction to GIS (Geographic Information Systems) and other technologies related to the field of geography. Completion of a summer assignment is required to maintain enrollment. Students are required to take the AP exam in May (Approx. Cost $91)

Pacific Rim 4211

  • Fall Only - .50 credit (Elective credit)
  • Prerequisites: Junior or senior class standing
  • Materials Needed: Pen, pencil, and notebook. $5.00 for consumable supplies

This class will study the nations of the Pacific Rim with an emphasis on East Asia and will focus on the role of developing nations in the world, study of physical, cultural, and economic geography of the developing world and the Pacific Rim, study pertinent demographic information of these nations, study economic social, historical, and political movements in Pacific Rim nations. Successful completion of this course meets the requirements established by colleges and universities for one-half credit in geography.