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Biology 1-2 3141/3142

  • Full Year - .50 Credit per Semester (Science Credit)
  • Materials Needed: $10 lab fee

This one-year laboratory science course is intended to develop an understanding of the fundamental concepts of biological science. This course meets the Nevada Academic Content Standards for Science. There are four life science disciplinary core ideas: 1) Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics; 2) Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity; 3) Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes; and 4) Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits. The performance expectations for high school life science blend the core ideas with scientific and engineering practices and crosscutting concepts to support students in developing useable knowledge that can be applied across disciplines. In this course, students will use basic mathematical computations and read and write critically to analyze biological investigations. This course meets high school graduation requirements for science, Gateway requirements, and college entrance requirements for laboratory science.

Biology 1-2 (H) 3143/3144

  • Full Year - .50 Credit per Semester (Science Credit)
  • Prerequisite: In order for students to succeed in Biology (H), students must have already completed Algebra 1-2 and be concurrently enrolled in Formal Geometry or higher. Students recommended by middle school math teachers for Algebra 1-2 should not be recommended for Biology (H).
  • Materials Needed: $15.00 Lab Fee, 3-Ring binder, spiral bound notebook, pens/pencils. A 2GB flash drive is recommended but not required.

This one-year laboratory science course is intended to build a deeper understanding of the fundamental concepts of biological science. Emphasis is placed on developing critical-thinking skills through research and advanced laboratory investigations. This course meets the Nevada Academic Content Standards for Science. There are four life science Disciplinary Core Ideas: 1) Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics; 2) Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity; 3) Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes; and 4) Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits. The performance expectations for high school life science blend the core ideas with scientific and engineering practices and crosscutting concepts that can be applied across disciplines. Students will use advanced mathematical computations, critically read and analyze biological text, and prepare formal written laboratory reports following biological investigations. This course meets high school graduation requirements for science, Gateway requirements, and college entrance requirements for laboratory science.

AP Biology 3149/3150

  • Full Year - .50 Credit per Semester (Science Credit)
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry with a “B” or better. This course is designed for the superior, highly motivated student. A “B” average or better is required for both semesters. Students must have a “B” average for enrollment in the 2nd semester.
  • Materials needed: Notebook, pen, and paper; students must take the AP Biology exam in May, therefore, they will need to pay the approximately $94.00 cost of the exam. NOTE: Lab course includes a $50.00 lab fee (fees covers and lab manuals and materials).

AP Biology is a college-level lab based course designed to mimic the first two semester introductory biology courses that a science major takes (i.e., Biology 190 and 191 at UNR) Students must take the AP exam in Biology. This course will examine in detail the four big ideas in biology: The process of evolution drives the diversity and unity of life, biological systems utilize free energy and molecular building blocks to grow, to reproduce and to maintain dynamic homeostasis, living systems store, retrieve, transmit and respond to information essential to life processes and biological systems interact, and these systems and their interactions possess complex properties

Physical Science 1-2 3101/3102

  • Full Year - .50 Credit per Semester (Science Credit)
  • Materials needed: Paper, pencil, pen, colored pencils or markers, binder (at least 2 ½”), ruler or straight edge, and a scientific calculator. A $10.00 lab fee is required.

This one-year course is intended to develop an understanding of fundamental concepts in physical science and is intended as a second year science course. This course meets the Nevada Academic Content Standards for Science. The areas from the disciplinary core ideas that will be studied are: 1) Matter and It’s Interactions; 2) Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions; 3) Energy; and 4) Waves and Their Applications in Technology for Information Transfer. The performance expectations for high school physical science blend the core ideas with scientific and engineering practices and crosscutting concepts to support students in developing useable knowledge that can be applied across disciplines. In this course, students will use basic mathematical computations and read and write critically to analyze physical science investigations. This course meets high school graduation requirements for science and college entrance requirements for laboratory science.

Students who have successfully completed Physical Science 1-2 may receive credit for taking Chemistry; however, students who have successfully completed Chemistry may not receive subsequent credit for Physical Science 1-2.

Chemistry 1-2 3201/3202

  • Full Year - .50 Credit per Semester (Science Credit)
  • Prerequisites: Completion of Biology 1-2 with a “C or better and completion of Algebra 1 with B or better.
  • Materials needed: Pencil, notebook, pen, and scientific calculator; $20.00 lab fee due the second week of class (includes periodic table and all consumable student supplies.)

This one-year laboratory science course is intended to develop an understanding of the fundamental concepts of chemical science. This course meets the Nevada Academic Content Standards for Science. The disciplinary core ideas are: 1) Structure and Properties of Matter; 2) Chemical Reactions; and 3) Energy in Chemical Processes. Performance expectations for this course blend the core ideas with scientific and engineering practices and crosscutting concepts to support students in developing useable knowledge that can be applied across disciplines. Students will use mathematical computations, read scientific text, and write critically to analyze data in chemical investigations. This course meets high school graduation requirements for science, Gateway requirements, and college entrance requirements for laboratory science. Students who have successfully completed Chemistry may not receive subsequent credit for Physical Science 1-2.

Chemistry 1-2 (H) 3203/3204

  • Full Year - .50 Credit per Semester (Science Credit)
  • Prerequisites: Completion of Biology 1-2 with a “B” or better and completion of Geometry with a “B” or better.
  • Requisite: Concurrent Enrollment in Algebra 2 Honors.
  • Materials needed: Pencil, notebook, pen, and scientific calculator; $20.00 lab fee due the second week of class (includes periodic table and all consumable student supplies.)

This one-year honors laboratory science course is intended to build a deeper understanding of the concepts of chemical science and prepare students for AP Chemistry. Emphasis is placed on developing critical-thinking skills through research and advanced laboratory investigations. This course meets the Nevada Academic Content Standards for Science. The disciplinary core ideas are: 1) Structure and Properties of Matter; 2) Chemical Reactions; and 3) Energy in Chemical Process. Performance expectations for this course blend the core ideas with scientific and engineering practices and crosscutting concepts that can be applied across disciplines. Students will use advanced mathematical computations, critically read scientific text, analyze chemical data, and prepare formal written laboratory reports following investigations. This course meets high school graduation requirements for science, Gateway requirements, and college entrance requirements for laboratory science.

AP Chemistry 3211/3212
AP Chem Lab (required) 3219/3220

  • Full Year - .50 Credit per Semester (Science Credit)
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 2 (H). Successful completion of Chemistry with minimum “B” average, (honors Chemistry is strongly recommended). This course is designed for the superior, highly motivated student. A “B” average or better is required for both semesters. Students must have a “B” average for enrollment in the 2nd semester.
  • Materials needed: Notebook, pencil, and pen; Students must take the AP Chemistry exam in May; therefore, they will need to pay the $94.00 cost of this exam.

This course is designed to be the equivalent of a college general chemistry course. Students must have the interest, maturity, and commitment to meet the challenges of such a course. Topics of investigation include the kinetic molecular theory, atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, chemical equilibrium, acid/base theory, metathesis reactions, oxidation reduction, thermo chemistry, and electrochemistry. There is a distinct emphasis on the mathematical formulations of chemical principles, and laboratory applications of principles discussed in class.

NOTE: In addition to this course, AP Chemistry students are required to enroll in AP Chemistry Lab which follows the class period each day at RHS.  The lab period parallels the laboratory experience offered in Chemistry 101 and 102 at UNR. There is a $100 lab fee for the year that includes the lab manual and online homework site registration.

Environmental Science 1-2 3111/3112

  • Full Year - .50 Credit per Semester (Science Credit)
  • Prerequisites: Two years of science; credit earned in Algebra 1.
  • Materials needed: 3-ring binder, spiral notebook, paper, pencils, pens, and colored pencils. A $10.00 lab fee is required to defray costs of expendable lab items and transportation fees for field trips.

This one-year laboratory science course is intended to develop an understanding of the fundamental concepts of environmental science. This course meets the Nevada Academic Content Standards for Science. The disciplinary core ideas are: 1) Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy and Dynamics; 2) Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity; 3) Energy; 4) Earth’s Place in the Universe; 5) Earth’s Systems; and 6) Earth and Human Activity. Performance expectations for this course blend the core ideas with scientific and engineering practices and crosscutting concepts to support students in developing a deeper understanding of how humans interact with the environment. Students will understand the complex and significant interdependencies between humans and rest of Earth’s systems by reading scientific text and writing critically to analyze data. This course meets high school graduation requirements for science, Gateway requirements, and college entrance requirements for laboratory science.

Earth Science 1-2 3131/3132

  • Full Year - .50 Credit per Semester (Science Credit)
  • Prerequisites: Two years of science; credit earned in Algebra 1.
  • Materials needed: 3-ring binder, spiral notebook, paper, pencils, pens, and colored pencils. A $10.00 lab fee is required to defray costs of expendable lab items and transportation fees for field trips.

This one-year laboratory science course is intended to develop an understanding of the fundamental concepts of Earth science. This course meets the Nevada Academic Content Standards for Science. There are five Earth science Disciplinary Core Ideas: 1) Earth’s Systems; 2) Human Impacts; 3) History of Earth; 4) Weather and Climate; and 5) Space Systems. The performance expectations for high school Earth science blend the core ideas with scientific and engineering practices and crosscutting concepts to support students in developing useable knowledge that can be applied across disciplines. In this course, students will use basic mathematical computations and read and write critically to analyze Earth science investigations. This course meets high school graduation requirements for science, Gateway requirements, and college entrance requirements for laboratory science.

Earth Science 1-2 (H) 3133/3134

  • Full Year - .50 Credit per Semester (Science Credit)
  • Prerequisites: To be eligible for honors status in Earth Science, the student must have successfully completed one year each of high school Biology and Chemistry, earning a grade of B or above, and have the written recommendation from a previous science teacher. To maintain honors status in Earth Science, the student must keep at least a “B” average and complete each literature review and research investigation on a semester basis. Honors Earth Science student candidates, and their parents, will sign a contract indicating that the student accepts, and the parent acknowledges, the extra requirements of conducting independent research investigations.
  • Materials needed: 3-ring binder, spiral notebook, paper, pencils, pens, and colored pencils. A $10.00 lab fee is required to defray costs of expendable lab items and transportation fees for field trips.

An Earth Science honors student would meet all the state science standards and content as described in the course catalog for regular Earth Science 1-2 and would be obliged to conduct a series of independent (outside-the-classroom) investigations or research projects that reinforce and extend those standards and objectives to a higher level. Each investigation, or its installment if long-term data collection is required, would be completed on a semester basis. Honors students would be free to choose from a list of suggested investigations focusing on such issues as assessing earthquake hazards in the Reno area, detailing geologic factors affecting Reno’s current and past climates, evaluating Reno’s impact on water quality of the Truckee River, and examining potential volcanic hazards of the Reno area. Some of these research projects will involve answering questions by analyzing and evaluating collected observational data. At the end of each quarter, the honors student would report his or her research findings to the class using visual aids, such as in a PowerPoint presentation.

AP Environmental Science 3115/3116
Lab (required) 3159/3160

  • Full Year - .50 Credit per Semester (Science Credit)
  • Prerequisites: Successful completions of Biology and Chemistry with a "B" or better, signature of referring science teacher AND AP Environmental Science teachers. This course is designed for motivated students interested in the various fields of Environmental Science, this includes independent reading requirements and a minimum time required on activities beyond regular class time. Students must maintain a "B" average to remain enrolled in the second semester.
  • Materials Needed: $50 lab fee, Class binder and spiral notebook. AP Exam fee of approx. $94.00.

This course is designed to provide students with a proficient understanding of the diverse content areas and concepts within Environmental Science. The course will provide students with the scientific principles, concepts and methodologies needed to understand the interrelationships of the natural world. Students will explore and analyze environmental issues both natural and man-made and the major role that humans exhibit on the earth’s ecosystems and planet. Class periods will include formal lecture, class discussion, current events, laboratory investigations, hands-on field collection activities, and presentations from a variety of science related experts. The course is a full year commitment with requirement that all students take the AP© College Board Exam in the spring at an approximate cost of $94.00. Students are required to participate in activities outside regular class times and commit 15 hours in a variety of projects related to the RHS Sustainable Agriculture project. ALL STUDENTS ENROLLED IN AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE MUST ALSO BE ENROLLED IN AP ENVIRONMENTAL FIELD LAB- MANDATORY REQUIREMENT. THESE ARE BACK TO BACK CLASSES, WITH THE FIELD LAB HELD 1 TO 2 DAYS EACH WEEK.

Human Anatomy  & Physiology (H) 3261/3262

  • Full Year - .50 Credit per Semester (Science Credit)
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of 2 years of science with a “C” or better in each course and successful completion of Algebra 1 and Geometry or higher with a “C” or better.
  • Requisite: Concurrent enrollment of Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus.
  • Materials needed: Notebook, paper, pencils, pens, spiral notebook, index cards and a $30.00 lab fee.

This one-year advanced level course is intended as a 3rd year Gateway course and will cover an introduction to the structural and functional aspects of the human body. This course is for those students interested in medical fields or biological science. The course is designed to cover the structure and function of cells, tissues, organs, and an in-depth look at body systems. Demonstrations and laboratory experience, including dissections are an integral part of the teaching of this course. This course meets high school graduation requirements for science, Gateway requirements, and college entrance requirements for laboratory science.

Upon successful completion of Human Anatomy and Physiology, students will develop: 1) an understanding of the methods and techniques used to study the human body; 2) knowledge of the structure of all systems in the body; 3) an understanding of the functions of all the systems of the human body; 4) an understanding of the role of each body system in maintaining the homeostatic balance of the human body; 5) an awareness of relevant pathologies associated with human body systems; and 6) an awareness of the professional opportunities and requirements in the health sciences and related fields.

AP Physics 1 3263/3264

  • Full Year - .50 Credit per Semester (Science Credit)
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of math through Algebra 2 and present enrollment in Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus. This class is not open for students who are taking Algebra 2 during the same year. Chemistry is recommended but is not required. Student responsibility and commitment are imperative because of the expensive equipment used in class.
  • Materials needed: Pen or pencil and paper for taking notes in lecture and lab; USB memory drive for saving documents; $10.00 fee (includes computer printing supplies and all consumable student supplies.) Students must take the AP Physics 1 test in May; therefore, they will need to pay approximately $94.00 for this exam.

AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course that explores topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits. Through inquiry-based learning, students will develop scientific critical thinking and reasoning skills. This course is identical to the first semester of a two semester college physics sequence for students pursuing degrees in sciences other than engineering and the physical sciences; e.g. pre-med, life sciences, environmental sciences, etc.

AP Physics C 3247/3248

  • Full Year - .50 Credit per Semester (Science Credit)
  • Prerequisites: Successful math completion through Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus, and concurrent enrollment in Advanced Placement Calculus. Chemistry or Chemistry (H) is highly recommended but is not required. Successful completion of AP Physics 1 is highly recommended for students who are not VERY strong mathematics students. Student responsibility and commitment are imperative because of the great amount of expensive equipment used in class.
  • Materials needed: Pen or pencil and paper for taking notes in lecture and lab; USB memory drive for saving documents; $10.00 fee (includes computer printing supplies and all consumable student supplies.) Students must take the AP Physics 1 test in May; therefore, they will need to pay approximately $94.00 for this exam.

AP Physics C: Mechanics is equivalent to the first semester of a calculus-based, college-level physics sequence. This course is especially appropriate for students planning to specialize or major in one of the physical sciences (physics, chemistry, geology, astronomy, etc.), computer sciences, or engineering. The course explores topics such as kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; and oscillations and gravitation. Introductory differential and integral calculus is used throughout the course.